The Do’s and Don’ts of Effective Telephone Skills for EVERYONE

The Do’s and Don’ts of Effective Telephone Skills  for EVERYONE

By Nancy Friedman, Customer Service Keynote speaker; President, Telephone Doctor Customer Service Training Telephone Doctor works with all kinds of people. For whatever reason, there’s a group of these folks who feel they’re in that old ivory tower and exempt themselves from telephone skills training. There is one thing, however, they have all agreed on – that there are always a few good tips from the Telephone Doctor. Here are a few good DO’s and DON’Ts and a LINK to our new book below. 1. DO acknowledge all your phone calls. Somehow. If you’re unable to return a phone call yourself, have it returned on your behalf. Not returning a phone call is like not using your turn signal – rude and sometimes dangerous. (Not returning calls label you as rude.) 2. DO place your own phone calls. Or if you absolutely need to have someone else place a call for you, at least be ready when the person you called is on the line. It’s legendary bad taste to get a call from someone’s assistant and then be put on hold to await Mr./Ms. Self-Important. 3. DO give bad news yourself. Not able to deliver on time? Canceling a

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T-L-C for Emails

T-L-C for Emails

Listen up. We did an audience survey at one of my recent speaking engagements. I wanted to know what really bugged folks about emails they received. Without hesitation, the top 3 were: * Poor spelling and grammar – Your, you’re; there, their, they’re; here, hear; to, too, two and the list goes on. And used by very supposedly, highly educated, smart folks. * Emails that are too long; too wordy. Emails that run several paragraphs that could be said in several sentences. * Subject lines that don’t match the body copy. There were others, but these three rose to the top. Then we talked about useless phrases used in emails. Ineffective words and phrases that could be left out. They’re not bad; simply useless and unnecessary (i.e., not needed). When these phrases are eliminated, the emails usually read better; sound stronger. Here we go: 1. “Just a note to let you know…” or “Just wanted to say…” or “I’m just checking back to see where we are on the order.” JUST is a weak, wimpy word. Not necessary. In fact, lame and useless. Eliminate the word JUST in your sentences. Read those sentences without the word “just” and see how

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Are You Camera Ready?

Are You Camera Ready?

By Nancy Friedman, Keynote Customer Service Speaker; President, Telephone Doctor Customer Service Training A while back at one of my corporate programs the owner of the company asked me if he could have 10 minutes before my session to talk with the group about an upcoming event. Naturally it was fine. I got to hear what he wanted and the responses. He explained to the group it had been a while since their company had updated their employee pictures. (That was evidenced, I admit, from the pictures on the wall and the 1990 hair do’s.) But I veer from the point. He said, “Next week the photographer will be in the office taking updated pictures of all our employees.” A young lady raised her hand and asked, “What day will the photographer be here?” The CEO asked, “Why do you ask?” The young girl said, “Well, I’d like to look nice.” Without missing a beat, the CEO said, “Why don’t you just look nice every day?” That was a lesson learned to me. Dress down days are fun for a lot of folks. But slob down days are an embarrassment to all. Be ‘camera ready’ all the time. You’ll never

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The Big Secret to Millennials

The Big Secret to Millennials

By Nancy Friedman, Keynote Customer Service Speaker; President, Telephone Doctor Customer Service Training   Millennials? What’s new about it? The biggest secret of all? Nothing. Nada. Zip. In my travels, working with this fun, bright, exciting group, I’ve found they’ve simply never been shown certain things. Of all the things they’re called, one is missed. And that is: EAGER. Yes, I found them eager. Eager to be good. To learn. They asked more questions than other groups I’ve spoken to in a while. I didn’t have any ‘know it all’s’ in the audience. Some folks say the millennials feel they are: Entitled Lazy Unfocused Narcissistic And a few other ‘titles.’ Well, you know what? Those are some of the same ‘titles’ used over the years with nearly every generation. And some folks never lose those titles. As they get older, some folks still feel they are still entitled. Some are still lazy, unfocused and narcissistic. I’m not a fan of name calling. It’s the old “sticks and stones can break my bones, but names can never harm me.” I have found most of the millennials I’ve had the opportunity to work with to be fun, bright, eager to learn, and

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